Nicky Morgan wants to ban work emails after 5pm

In an article in the Telegraph today the education secretary Nicky Morgan referred to the excessive workload that is starting to affect recruitment and retention of teachers.  The message the newspaper chose to focus on was the suggestion that teachers should not be answering emails or marking work after 5pm.

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Unfortunately cutting out emails isn’t going to make much difference but she touched upon something that could.  Nicky referred to sharing planning as a way to reduce workload.  Of course teachers will always have to adapt plans to suit the needs of an individual group but it is the idea of working smart where she hits the mark.

Working smart

Be organised.  This sounds like a given but I spent years as an AST working with failing teachers and one of the traits they had in common was an inability to manage their time and workloads.

Bin paperwork – be paperless as far as possible. Store worksheets and marks electronically. Share these with colleagues and use them as a starting point for future lessons.

Plan smart – use peer assessment, self marking and computer marking to help reduce your workload.  Create a departmental marking policy that works to maximise impact rather than trying to tick boxes for Ofsted.  Unfortunately marking is coming under more scrutiny as Ofsted look for effectiveness of teaching over time.  Keep comments brief and give students opportunity to respond to marking – and mark this on the next cycle.  It might sound onerous but it can work to reduce workload once students are trained.

To do lists are closely related to planning.  I keep mine in Outlook – I use tasks and I flag emails for follow-up.  I can access this list wherever I am.  Different people use different systems but find something that works for you.

Have a structure – whether it be for paperwork (I’m probably about 90% paper-free now) or for the files on your computer.  Don’t just drop files on the desktop – it’s easy at the time but you will want them later.

Embrace technology – most teachers use technology now to create worksheets and resources, but create lesson plans electronically. Reuse and share them. I plan on my Outlook calendar – easy to share if I’m out of school as well. Create your diary online and calendar your planning and marking.  Rota in which class books you will mark and when.  SIMS (or your MIS) is your friend – use it to your advantage to log positive and negative behaviour, communication with parents etc.

Be disciplined.  I dread to think of how many hours over the year I’ve spent in the prep room or the staff room chatting.  This has a valuable function in keeping stress levels down, but an hour of PPA time spent marking is an hour earlier you can stop work that evening.

Work as a team.  Primary schools embraced joint planning years ago, secondary schools are starting to catch up with this now.  Divide the workload and spread it out.  Make sure all members of the team are clear in their expectations and responsibilities – for example knowing the deadlines for writing a unit of work and where to save it on the server when done.

Delegate tasks and responsibilities.  Ask the TA with the group to phone a parent and log the call, or ask trusted students to straighten the room at the end of the lesson.  Ask your team members for help with generating ideas, but don’t take on work that isn’t yours.

Learn when to say no and be assertive.  Don’t be afraid to say “I’m sorry I can’t do this tonight – I don’t have time”.  You could follow that up with a comment like “but I’ll have it done before the weekend”.  This also applies to needless paperwork and planning.

Work life balance.  It has been said that you should work to live, not live to work. Whilst teachers love their jobs (or the ones that stay in the profession do!) there is more to life that school.  Switch off, relax and do something else.  I have a long drive that acts as a buffer zone between home and school, and a dog that needs a lot of walking.

There is a lot that teachers can do to help themselves, but we have to accept that teaching isn’t a 9-5 job.  Those that manage to fit their work into those hours are either not doing everything they should or have an alternative career as a time management consultant ahead of them should they tire of teaching.

Have you any suggestions for reducing teacher workload?  Please leave a comment below.

How to make your Science class more exciting?

This is a guest post.  Please use the contact me section at the top of the page if you are interested in writing for fiendishlyclever.

One of the most common problems educators face, especially when dealing with younger students, is how to make their classes more exciting and fun? In a post by the Daily Mail, a member of parliament, said in a press conference that science has become boring, which makes student disinterested when it comes to the subject. However, a change in the curriculum is expected soon to encourage more students to join STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) professions, especially concerning females. But, how can do you transform your Science class into an interactive and fun environment? In this post, we will show you three effective ways on how you can innovate your class.

Go out and explore
The best Science lessons are taught by encompassing the outside environment for a change of scenery. Encourage your class to explore outside the four corners of your classroom and maximize all the resources. Set up a field trip if necessary and visit the nearest Science museum in your area.

Click here to view the top Science museums in the United States.

If your school has a well-preserved garden or located near a park, you can take your class there and take photos of various plants and flowers, animals, and insects.At the end of the day, you should expect your students to be filled with stories that they want to share and discuss with other students, which is a good interactive way to get their attention.

Flip the classroom
A new type of a blended learning strategy has been introduced recently to educators, which is called the Flipped Classroom experience. It is the process wherein it reverses the traditional educational procedure by providing learning materials to students for them to watch or read at home, then they will be engaged in an activity related to the topic when they get back in class the next day.

In a traditional classroom model, the instructor is the central focus of the discussion where they discuss and respond to the questions of the students. However, with the flipped classroom it is more learner-centred, in which students are provided with the learning materials which they will discuss the next day while the educators administers the activities, either a debate, experiment, seatwork, etc.

Maximize smartphones and apps
With the increase in the consumption of online resources and ownership of mobile devices by students, it is forecasted that smartphones and tablets will continue to be significant technologies in the classroom. A study by McGraw-Hill Education reported that from 2013 to 2014, college students using mobile devices to study rose to an unprecedented 81%, which is expected to climb higher in the coming years. Smartphones, in particular, appear to be more convenient to students as it allows them to make and receive calls and texts, while accessing apps and online references from a single device. Today’s handsets are highly powerful, too, such as the iPhone 6 and the Galaxy S6. The former, based on a feature post by O2, has a huge screen at 4.7-inches, with 64-bit processing power, and a battery life that can last for up to 24 hours – making this handset one of the ideal smartphones for students and even educators on the go.

Smartphones also offer professors and students a convenient way to collaborate even while on the go, via video conferencing apps such as Google Hangout or Skype, and via cloud storages such as the Google Drive, the Skydrive, or the Dropbox. There are also apps that can help make your class more interesting.

• Video Science is a collection of videos by science educator and adviser Dan Menelly that runs from 2 to 3 minutes.
• Moon Globe HD allows your class to view 3D high definition photos of the moon from your location, and even interact with it virtually by spinning the digital moon on the screen while exploring every nook and crater.
• Frog Dissection is an app that allows students to virtually dissect a frog via their device by following a step by step instruction of the voice-over.
• Science360 is an interactive app for iPad users that presents mosaic images of various topics and branches of science with stories and discussions.

If you want to view more applications that you can maximize in class, here is a list of the best STEM apps for teaching.

Turning Science into a fun subject depends on the educators’ capability to adapt to changes and find innovative ways on how to capture modern students’ attention. It will be helpful to have an open discussion with your class to gather their ideas on what they expect to learn from your Science class, then apply those ideas to your curriculum this school term. How do you turn your Science class into an interactive one?

Assessment without levels

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Background

National Curriculum levels were consigned to the history books last September or so was the intention of the government when it launched its new curriculum.  I’ve been in contact with science teachers all over the country and most are still gathering information about what assessment should look like and formulating a way forward.

I’ve attended CPD events and read articles and blog posts in an attempt to see what everyone else is planning and to make sure I’m on the right track.  The change is so fundamental to everything we do as science teachers that we want to make sure that we are on the right track.

We’ve known that levels have had their faults for years.   We know that schools place more emphasis on their worth than they should.  We know that they can stigmatise children who compare their levels to friends and family.  We know that progression doesn’t always happen in a linear way through the national curriculum levels (or through sub-levels if you use PIVATS and B-Squared in special schools).   Students are expected to make a certain number of levels of progress over a key stage and are tested over and over again (tracking and assessment windows anyone?) to make sure they are on target.

So what comes next?

We’ve been discussing quality assessment within our regional committee for the ASE for several months now.  Models used by members within the committee have a similar feel although the language differs between them.  Some schools have three tiers, some four etc which replace the old levels.  An example is given below

Competencies Embryonic/ Developing Achieving (expected) Exceeding
 
 

 

Other professionals use language like beginning, developing, enhancing crafting, crafting, perfecting, mastering and so on.

The idea is simple – you develop (although let us be honest, most schools will be looking for a system to adopt from outside) a system where for each topic/lesson teachers have identified what students will be expected to achieve and worked backwards/forwards from this point.  Of course having a set of statements is only the beginning of the journey, using them for formative and summative assessment will take a little more time to get right.

Sticking with the old national curriculum levels is fine for now but long term is likely to be considered bad practice.  They are likely to be a starting point in developing a new system that better reflects the new national curriculum.

As a school leader I have a new set of questions that come up every time I think of assessment.

Tracking over the key stage – will we expect set targets based on the targets (for example 80% of students reaching the expected standard).  Will we track individuals towards their target like we do now?  How will we track progress towards the target (hopefully sublevels are well and truly dead).

Comparability with other subjects – will we easily be able to compare science with other subjects to see how students are doing (or if we can’t do this does it matter that we can’t?)

Ofsted – what will they be expecting to see and will inspectors have been trained on the changes? I know some have been asking questions about assessment and levels since they stopped being statutory.

How will our system compare to mainstream schools – very few of our students may make expected progress and we don’t want to create a system that is as demotivating as what we have now.  It also needs to be appropriate for groups of students that span a wide range of levels under NC levels.

So where are we now?

I’m still gathering my thoughts and doing my research.  I know that Activate (the scheme of work I’ve bought in as a starting point) has started moving in the right direction but I’d be interested to hear from those that are further along the journey than I am.  Hopefully I’ll manage to get my head around assessment at KS3 before the changes to GCSE come in and that changes too!

a reminder: how to request your observation notes from Ofsted

I recently wrote some posts about requesting your evidence forms from Ofsted.  One of the benefits of being in special measures is that you get plenty of attention from Ofsted.

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Despite having been jointly observed and receiving feedback by my head, I still wanted to see my observation notes and what had been written about my lesson.  I’ve attached a copy of the feedback (part of a section 8 monitoring visit) so you can see what you get back.

S5 evidence form

All it takes is a quick email:

The address you need to use is ‘informationrequest@ofsted.gov.uk
The email I sent is below – I included a scanned copy of my driving licence
I would like to request a copy of the S5 evidence forms completed during the recent section 8 monitoring inspection of my school.  Hopefully the information below will help you to identify the forms in question.
Name:
Home address
Contact number
School
Date of lesson
Time of lesson
Year group
Name of inspector
Subject
Details of lesson content
I’d be interested to hear from other people that have requested their observation notes like me :)

 

Free science literacy resources from the author of William’s Words in Science

IWWcells‘ve written before about William’s Words in Science (here) and his resources for cells (here) and food/digestion (here).  While at was at the ASE annual conference last month I met the author, Dr William Hirst in person.  I was pleased to see him selling his excellent resources at his stand, and more importantly I was pleased to see other people buying them.  If you haven’t seen his resources, read my reviews linked above and visit William’s site (if you buy anything, be sure to tell him I sent you – note I don’t receive any commission or financial kickback, I just happen to rate his resources!)

More importantly while I was at his stand I discovered that William has many free resources that are available for any one to download from his site.  These resources showcase the strategies that are used in his books and can be used to drop into your lessons.  I would like to hope that some of my readers will try the resources and feed back to William (contact details are available on his site).

If you want an idea of what is available, William gave me permission to host a selection of these resources here – alternatively bookmark his site which will be updated more often than this blogpost.

Williams Word Games in Science

 

What Ofsted had to say about my lesson – how to get your observation notes from them

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A while ago I wrote about Ofsted observing my lesson and the lack of any way to improve to outstanding. While I received my feedback I saw that the HMI had made two sides of notes about my lesson and I wondered if there was anything on those notes that might indicate why the lesson was not outstanding.

I decided to request a copy of the S5 evidence forms that were written during my lesson after reading this blog here that gave instructions. The premise is simple, you make a data protection request to Ofsted providing as much information about the lesson as possible and a copy of your identification. Ofsted then confirm receipt of your application and have forty days to respond.

I had forgotten about the request (it had taken them over a month to act upon it) and received a letter by special delivery (if you have ever used the special delivery service you will realise how expensive it is). Inside the envelope was a copy of the S5 forms and a covering letter. The S5 forms had a number of sections blanked out – these were passages that referred to the teaching assistant who was with the group for that lesson.

The lesson notes didn’t tell me anything new, my feedback apparently had been very comprehensive but at least I had evidence that my lesson was good. It was also useful to test the process of getting your data from Ofsted so that others will be able to do the same. Whilst you can’t use the evidence form to challenge the judgement with Ofsted, it does provide opportunity for reflection and also for bloggers to challenge the judgement on their blogs.

It would also be interesting to see what would happen if Ofsted had to do this for every teacher, perhaps they would introduce a charge since I don’t think they would be allowed to go bankrupt!

Let me know if you have requested a copy of your observation notes or if you plan to do so.

Stop and remember why you love teaching…

I work hard.  Very hard.  I’m at school for 10 hours a day and then I work at home several evenings and weekends too.  Sometimes, like all teachers, I wonder why on Earth do I bother?  With reports to write, data to enter into SIMS, IEPS to update, leadership reports, governors reports, lesson observations and so on, it can be easy to lose sight of our core purpose.

This week I was doing a levelled task with my KS3 classes.  This was a piece of work from one of my students.  Without giving too much information away, he is able but like many of my students he is hampered by his special needs.  You can see from the work that he struggles with literacy and writing.  I think he was as pleased as I was with his work – he even came back in his lunch break to add the extra information he thought he needed to put in to reach his level 5 (together with some fantastic answers in class).

We work on A4+ books which means they are larger than the scanning glass on the photocopier, however you get an idea of his achievement.

We all experience moments like this, when a student gets it or suddenly demonstrates real achievement.  Hang on to them this Friday and remember why you became a teacher – it really does help you get through the rest of the less desirable tasks that come with the job!

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